Posts tagged growing up
Exercise as an Evidence-Based Practice

Many teens and adults on the autism spectrum are less physically active in comparison to their peers. Exercise can be used to improve the overall physical fitness of autistic individuals. Also, exercise can be used to increase coping skills and decrease challenging behaviors (aggression, self-injurious behaviors). In this post, we’ll be discussing how to create and integrate daily opportunities for physical activity for teens and adults with ASD.

Read More
Peer-mediated Instruction & Intervention

One of the main characteristics of autism is social communication challenges. Individuals on the autism spectrum can benefit from working with peers. This strategy is referred to as peer-mediated instruction and intervention. This post shares what peer-mediated instruction and interventions are and how you can use them.

Read More
Visual Supports

Individuals on the autism spectrum have strengths in visual processing and visual search skills compared to neurotypical individuals. By visually presenting information, such as directions about what to do or what will happen next, individuals with ASD are more likely to process information more easily and quickly. This strategy is referred to as visual supports. This post shares what visual supports are and how you can use them.

Read More
Autism Resource: Evidence Based Practices

In this post, I’ll be sharing a FREE resource for you to learn about evidence-based practices specifically studied with learners on the autism spectrum. The Autism Focused Intervention Resources & Modules (AFIRM) is a fantastic resource made up of video modules and interactive learning to teach you about using all of the 27 identified evidence-based practices for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Read More
Autism in Puberty - 4 Ways to Prepare Your Autism Teen

Our kids with autism spectrum disorder are growing up. Just like every other kid. In a way, that is definitely one thing you can expect to occur in your very busy life as a parent. And just like every other kid, puberty seems to pop up out of nowhere. I’m there with you – it seems like just yesterday my youngest brother Tanner, was running around in diapers acting out scenes from Dora the Explorer with me. And now he turned 18 last November!

Read More
Benefits of Technology Use for Individuals with ASD

Technology is a bit of a big deal in the ASD population (and that’s an understatement). People on the autism spectrum and their families use technology for a number of uses. Sure, there are a lot of negative experiences, but the benefits can outweigh these with some support. This post will share options in how individuals with ASD use technology and to encourage you to think about ways to incorporate them in your child’s day-to-day. Specifically, I’ll share several options, routes, and ideas about using technology in the home, school, and community, and all the places you go. In this guide, technology refers to any devices (computers, smart phones, tablets) and programs on them (apps!)

Read More
Organizational Strategies for Your Child with Autism

First of all, why is getting organized important? Organization is an often-reported issue from individuals on the autism spectrum and their parents and families. Being organized allows our children to be prepared, build independence, and lessens stress and anxiety for them (and all of us.) In this post, I’ll share ways to get your child with autism more organized and to encourage creative ways to get this done.

Read More
Autism Support Groups - Finding Your Community

I love this quote from Helen Keller: “Alone, we can do so little together we can do so much.” It really resonates with me because this is how I feel about the autism community as a big sis and professional. It’s really easy to feel alone with autism in your life, but I’ve found over time that a community you curate can help out in the long run. This post shares ways for you to discover and connect with a community of your choosing and creating.

Read More
Autism in Adulthood - Why We Should Talk About It

Today, let’s talk. I’m going to be talking about why we need to be talking about autism and adulthood. I know a lot of talking right? But this is an important topic to me for a number of reasons and I know they’ll resonate with you too. As a sister, I’m watching my two brothers with autism spectrum disorder grow up – they’re both adults now. Tanner turned 18 last November and Tyler is 26. As a professional, I’m watching a population of clients/former clients/individual on the spectrum grow up and become adults. Now I’m feeling old!

Read More